Read Up: 7 Food Books from Tucson Authors

Last modified on March 17th, 2017 at 10:00 am

If the Tucson Festival of Books last weekend left you wanting more to read, consider checking out writing from one of Tucson’s many culinary figures.

The vivid world of Tucson food writing is appetizing, titillating, and inspiring.

El Charro Cafe: The Tastes and Traditions of Tucson by Carlotta Flores

Carne Seca Burro at El Charro Café on Court Avenue (Credit: Jackie Tran)

Carne Seca Burro at El Charro Café on Court Avenue (Credit: Jackie Tran)

With El Charro Café locations throughout Tucson, it’s easy to get a classic taste of Tucson. If you want to fire up the kitchen instead, El Charro Cafe owner Carlotta Flores shares the rich family history with recipes for Sopa de Tortilla, Albondigas de Chorizo, Topopo a la Jalisciense, and dozens more.

For more information, visit the El Charro Cafe: The Tastes and Traditions of Tucson page on Amazon.

Getting Naked for Money: An Accidental Travel Writer Reveals All by Edie Jarolim

Getting Naked for Money, Edie Jarolim

Getting Naked for Money, Edie Jarolim

You might recognize Edie Jarolim‘s name from her recent Tucson Foodie article about the Coronet’s happy hour. Her memoir Getting Naked for Money chronicles her adventures in travel publishing and writing with quirky stories from around the globe. It starts with a tale of Jarolim’s time at a nudist resort in Palm Springs and only gets racier from there.

For more information, visit the Getting Naked for Money: An Accidental Travel Writer Reveals All page on Amazon.

Lost Restaurants of Tucson by Rita Connelly

Lost Restaurants of Tucson by Rita Connelly (Credit: Arcadia Publishing)

Lost Restaurants of Tucson by Rita Connelly (Credit: Arcadia Publishing)

Lost Restaurants of Tucson is perfect for those curious about Tucson’s rich culinary background or those seeking nostalgia with legendary restaurants such as Café Terra Cotta and Fuego. Writer Rita Connelly previously wrote for the Tucson Weekly, but now writes for her website wellfedfoodieblog.

For more information, visit the Lost Restaurants of Tucson page on Amazon.

Modern Southwest Cooking by Ryan Clark

Modern Southwest Cooking by Ryan Clark (Credit: Rio Nuevo Publishers)

Modern Southwest Cooking by Ryan Clark (Credit: Rio Nuevo Publishers)

Casino Del Sol Resort Executive Chef Ryan Clark graduated at the top of his class and has been a leading culinary figure since then. While he’s skilled with techniques from around the world, his cookbook focuses on modern interpretations of southwest dishes with recipes for Passionfruit and Chiltepin Spritz and Seared Scallops with Meyer Lemon Curd.

For more information, visit the Modern Southwest Cooking page on Amazon.

The Great Chiles Rellenos Book by Janos Wilder

The Great Chiles Rellenos Book by Janos Wilder (Credit: Laurie Smith)

The Great Chiles Rellenos Book by Janos Wilder (Credit: Laurie Smith)

James Beard award-winning chef Janos Wilder shares his story venturing into the world of chiles rellenos, including tales of his first taste and quest to develop his ideal relleno. Thousands of rellenos later, he’s curated a list of over 30 recipes ranging from rellenos to poppers to culichi sauce.

For more information, visit The Great Chiles Rellenos Book page on Amazon.

Food Lovers’ Guide to Tucson: The Best Restaurants, Markets & Local Culinary Offerings by Mary Paganelli Votto

Food Lovers' Guide to Tucson: The Best Restaurants, Markets & Local Culinary Offerings by Mary Paganelli Votto (Credit: Globe Pequot)

Food Lovers’ Guide to Tucson: The Best Restaurants, Markets & Local Culinary Offerings by Mary Paganelli Votto (Credit: Globe Pequot)

Mary Paganelli Votto did her research for this comprehensive dining guide, featuring restaurants and food trucks. However, be aware it was published in 2013, so some of the information is outdated in the dynamic world of opening and closing restaurants.

For more information, visit Food Lovers’ Guide to Tucson: The Best Restaurants, Markets & Local Culinary Offerings on Amazon.

Unprocessed: My City-Dwelling Year of Reclaiming Real Food by Megan Kimble

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As the Edible Baja Arizona editor, Megan Kimble already knew food on a level that’s difficult to match. She pushed it even further when she went an entire year without eating processed foods. She milled wheat, slaughtered a sheep, extracted salt from the sea, and more while still working her day job. Unprocessed chronicles her personal experience along while also providing extensive interviews and research from a wide range of sources.

For more information, visit Unprocessed: My City-Dwelling Year of Reclaiming Real Food on Amazon.

Have another favorite food book from a Tucson writer? Let us know in the comments.

Jackie is a food writer and photographer native to Tucson. He enjoys neon-lit dinners and long crab walks on the beach. If you'd like to stalk him, visit jackietran.com